Faculty salaries driving up the cost of college? Not so much

Here’s an interesting piece from today’s Inside Higher Ed, “Slow Recovery.”  To quote the opening paragraphs:

An annual survey of faculty salaries being released today by the American Association of University Professors paints a dismal picture, suggesting that a historic low period for compensation increases continues. This trend may go on for a while, the report says, and it questions whether the numbers will ever go back to where they were before the Great Recession.

According to the survey, titled “A Very Slow Recovery,” average faculty salaries rose by 1.8 percent in 2011-12 at institutions that submitted data for this academic year and the last one. The increase, the survey points out, is less than the 3 percent rate of inflation in the same time period.

“When all of the salary data submitted in each year is adjusted to account for inflation, the overall average salary of a full-time faculty member in 2011-12 is less than 1 percent higher than it was five years ago, in 2006-2007,” says the report, which includes data from 1,250 colleges and universities.

But I really think they buried the lead here.  The piece also includes a handy chart that compares the average increase in tuition and fees at colleges/universities over the last 30 years versus increases in faculty salaries.  So, for example:  while tuition and fees at public four year institutions have risen 72% over the last 10 years, faculty salaries at maters universities (e.g., places like EMU) have declined 5.3%.

3 responses to “Faculty salaries driving up the cost of college? Not so much

  1. Great to know as negotiations near and the suits once again try to plead poverty

  2. There needs to be a chart next to all of that of the cost of facilities including improvements and additions…I’m sure that’s where you’ll find your cost increases.

  3. I would like to know how much the large rocks that appeared all over campus in the last year cost. I suspect it is quite a lot of money. Landscaping is nice but in a time of layoffs and deep cuts to both staff and facilities (library?), I think we could have forgone the rocks.

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